Mr T goes to sea, hopefully leaving us a safety lesson

Ben Ellison

Ben Ellison

Panbo editor, publisher & chief bottlewasher from 4/2005 until 8/2018, and now excited to have Ben Stein as very able publisher, webmaster, and editing colleague. Panbo is going to the next level in 2019 and beyond.

4 Responses

  1. Noelle says:

    Very cool maps. Thanks for the laboratory info. I’ve forwarded this everyone i know who snowbirds from the frozen midwest.

  2. I heard from Gary K of the Conch Republic Marine Army, which seems to be doing great hurricane clean-up work in the Keys and seeks donations, including “a good GPS/chartplotter so they can better pinpoint and map where their efforts have been and where they should be”:

    ********************************************************************

    As a winter resident of Marathon and a supporter of the Turtle Hospital, I enjoyed your article about the release ofMr. T. But it was your mention of a “green vacation” in the “string of low islands” that sparked this letter.

    I am a volunteer with the Conch Republic Marine Army (CRMA) in Big Pine Key, FL. They are a 501(c)(3) group of volunteers committed to the task of clearing the Keys’ mangroves and nearshore waters from the damage caused by Hurricane Irma. Many of these people had their lives, jobs and homes either badly damaged or destroyed. Yet they are dedicated to cleaning and restoring the Keys’ marine habitat.

    Their website, http://www.conchrepublicmarinearmy.org and their Facebook page detail their history and efforts that now number 24 clean-up events they call ‘battles,’ including the April 27 Battle at Long Key State Park, held in conjunction with the Florida State Parks. Altogether, more than 2,600 volunteers have contributed over 15,000 hours of work and removed over 132 tons of trash and debris, all by hand and with no governmental funding. Sadly, they have barely scratched the surface of what needs to be done….

  3. Thats a great story about data, community, research and citizen science. GIS data is being used in so many ways to expand our knowledge of the planet. And who doesn’t enjoy a good sea turtle story? Thanks Ben.

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