Yacht Devices introduces NMEA 2000 battery monitor

5 Responses

  1. gregy says:

    looks like an excellent product, however I was dissapointed to see that it “only” supports
    current shunts – which makes it difficult for a retrofit (requires breaking into cables, new additional lug/connections etc ) & also adds some additional voltage losses from shunt and connections.
    With the advent of reasonable priced hall effect (DC current) thru hole transducers – which are “non invasive” and much simpler for a retrofit … this option would be appealing to many i suspect

    • In my experience, Hall effect DC current sensors are prone to drifting, necessitating frequency recalibration. They’re also (presumably because of the low level/high impedance output signal) quite prone to RFI – talking on the SSB shouldn’t mess up your battery meter!

  2. I’m not sure what’s “standard” about a 75mv shunt – every battery monitor shunt I’ve ever encountered was a 50mv shunt. And the pictured (very small) shunt isn’t likely to be very useful in a typical boat installation.

    • Ben Stein Ben Stein says:

      Good catch, I’d missed that. I think that’s a typo since I saw a pre-production unit working on what appeared to be a standard 50mv shunt. I also think the one you’re seeing in this picture is a rendering but it’s irrelevant either way as they don’t intend to supply the shunt.

      -Ben S.

      • They do say the device will work with other types of shunt, so I suppose it’s fully programmable – a good thing. It seems to me that most of the digital current meters/shunts coming out of the far east nowadays use 75mv shunts (though all I’ve seen are way below 500 amp) so that may be the source of their wording. I have a 50amp/75mv shunt here that looks a lot like the one in their picture.

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